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The Scarborough Oral History Collection is a fully searchable digital collection of interviews and oral histories available for education and research purposes. As part of an interdisciplinary course-based research initiative that began in 2013, we made a commitment to preserve the stories collected in a publicly accessible web-based system and to that end worked with the UTSC Digital Scholarship Unit to design and maintain a digital collection built on the Islandora Oral History Solution Pack. The collection currently consists of special collections including: The Stories of Scarborough Collection - audio recordings and transcripts of stories collected by the student researchers as part of their course work; the Stories of UTSC – a collection of oral history interviews conducted with members of our campus community past and present; and the Oral History Collection of Ethiopian and Eritrean Migration – a collection developed as a student independent study research project. For more information on these collections please contact: Christine Berkowitz chris.berkowitz@utoronto.ca or dsu.utsc@utoronto.ca

Interview with Sandford Borins

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Professor Sandford Borins was the chair of the UTSC Management department from 1991-2003 (with two years of research leave). After arriving at UTSC, Prof. Borins actively created and built a new Management program. Prof. Borins speaks about the administrative and academic challenges and acheviements of the Management department -- as well as the campus more broadly. After 2003, Prof. Borins continued to teach, research, and publish as a faculty member of the university.

Interview with Christopher Waddell

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Christopher Waddell reflects on his experience growing up in Scarborough and attending University of Toronto Scarborough, which was then known as Scarborough College, as an undergraduate from 1970 to 1974. Christopher provides an insight into the settlement and development of Scarborough prior to the increased diversification of its inhabitants, adding that the student body of Scarborough College largely reflected the demographics of Scarborough at the time. Studying in the General Arts program, Waddell discusses his interactions with student politicians as well as touching upon his own experience as the Vice-President of the Student Council. Additionally, Waddell mentions some of the initiatives he was involved in, such as collaborating with other students to found the student campus newspaper, The Balcony Square. Waddell ends by connecting his time at Scarborough College to his long career in both public service and academia.

Interview with Susan Horton

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Professor Susan Horton was a faculty member and administrator at UTSC from the mid 1980s-2004. As the program coordinator of International Development Studies (IDS), she had the opportunity to actively participate in the development of the IDS co-op program and connect with students. During this time Professor Horton also occupied a graduate appointment at UTSG and so, she discusses the difficulties of balancing her time and travelling between UTSC and the downtown campus. This experience has also allowed her to comment on how the downtown campus' perception of UTSC. Professor Horton reflects upon her administrative and faculty experience at UTSC and her impact on the UTSC co-op program.

Interview with Neil ten Kortenaar

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Professor Neil ten Kortenaar began teaching at UTSC during the 1980s. After completing his PhD at the University of Toronto, Prof. ten Kortenaar soon became a faculty member in the Humanities department at Scarborough College. Prof. ten Kortenaar reflects upon the rich diversity of the Scarborough campus, his approach to teaching English courses, and his experience as an administrator at both the St. George and Scarborough campuses. As of summer 2020, Prof. ten Kortenaar is currently the Chair of the English department at UTSC.

Interview with Robert Binnick

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Linguist Professor Robert Binnick joined Scarborough College in 1972 and retired in 2011. He talks about his faculty experiences working with all three campuses of the University of Toronto, as well as the tensions between the downtown and Scarborough campuses. With over thirty years of experiences at the University of Toronto, he brings great insight into the growth and change of the Scarborough campus, the humanities department, and the study of humanities as a whole.

Interview with Ron Smyth

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Professor Ronald Smyth, now with Emeritus status, began teaching at UTSC during the late 1980s when he was appointed in both Linguistics and Psychology, as well as acting in various administrative roles on campus. In discussing first impressions and his early career at UTSC, Prof. Smyth comments on the brutalist architecture of the campus, both through his own experience navigating the campus and his perspective of how the growth of the student body during his time here has change the original architecture. His discussion of the relationship between the St. George and Scarborough campus highlights the similarities he has observed between the two which debunks prevalent negative misconceptions of Scarborough. Prof. Smyth also reflects upon his personal experience as a gay professor on campus, touching upon the LGBTQ+ community on campus and the changes in the reception of the Positive Space Committee.

Interview with Ann MacDonald

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Ann MacDonald joined UTSC in 2002 as Director and Curator of the Gallery. A few years later, Ann was wrapped up in opening and operating the Doris McCarthy Gallery (DMG). She even met many times with Doris McCarthy to discuss its operations. Beyond directing and curating countless art exhibits on campus, Ann also teaches courses in the Department of Arts, Culture and Media (ACM). Ann reflects about the Scarborough community, her approach to teaching, and the operations of the DMG.

Interview with Andrew Arifuzzaman

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As of 2021, Andrew Arifuzzaman is the Chief Administrative Officer at the University of Toronto Scarborough’s (UTSC) Office of Business, Operations, and Strategic Affairs. As a resident of Scarborough for over 30 years, Andrew reflects upon the evolution that he has witnessed in Scarborough, ranging from negative perceptions of the area, emerging diversification of the community, as well as differing views concerning the establishment of the Toronto Pan Am Sports Centre in Scarborough. He links such perceptions to a larger discussion of the contention and differences between UTSC and UTSG stemming from 1964. Andrew joined UTSC in 2007 as the Chief Strategy Officer, around the time when universities began to shift from academic management towards the emergence of professional management. He talks about his responsibilities over the day-to-day operations of the campus as its CAO along with the business side of UTSC and its methods of generating revenue, including the recruitment of international students from the Green Path Program.

Interview with Gudrun Curri

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Linguist Professor Robert Binnick joined Scarborough College in 1972 and retired in 2011. He talks about his faculty experiences working with all three campuses of the University of Toronto, as well as the tensions between the downtown and Scarborough campuses. With over thirty years of experiences at the University of Toronto, he brings great insight into the growth and change of the Scarborough campus, the humanities department, and the study of humanities as a whole.

Interview with Franca Iacovetta

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Professor Franca Iacovetta joined the Historical and Cultural Studies Department at UTSC in 1990, originally to teach British history, but she is now able to focus on Canadian and immigration history. She shares her teaching experiences, her perceptions of the campus, as well as the changes in student perception of professors at UTSC over time. She also held a dual-campus position, where she was also involved with St. George's graduate program.

Interview with Curtis Cole

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As of 2021, Curtis Cole is the Registrar and Assistant Dean of Enrolment Management at the University of Toronto Scarborough. He first joined UTSC in 2002 as an Academic Advisor at the Academic Advising and Career Centre. Born and raised in southwest Scarborough, Cole talks about the early perceptions of UTSC as a "backdoor" to the University of Toronto and talks about the evolution of Scarborough as a legitimate part of the University of Toronto. Cole discusses the public perception of UTSC, both in regards to domestic students and on an international scale. Cole also touches upon the changing value of undergraduate degrees, as well as the recruitment and rise and of international student admission and tuition at UTSC.

Interview with Fatah Awil

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Fatah Awil speaks about the non-profit organization Urban Alliance On Race Relations in regards to their work on race relations and creation of training sessions across Ontario. Fatah describes his position as a program coordinator of the Diversity Youth Fellowship, which encourages and supports youth from Muslim, Black, Tamil and Filipino groups to become politically involved by providing them with internship opportunities in City Hall. As a previous fellow of this program, Fatah discusses the impact of the Diversity Fellowship both on the fellows that are involved in this program and for their communities as these fellows bridge the gap between their communities and city counsellors and the Mayor. He talks about the support that the Alliance has been providing and the advocation work it has done during COVID-19 for minorities working in high-risk jobs such as nurses, as well as how it has impacted their social activism.

Interview with Russell Brown

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Russell Brown looks back at his time at UTSC as an English professor from 1977 to 2004 along with the summer school courses at the downtown campus that he recently taught. He touches upon the “golden age” of UTSC where a small body of faculty and students allowed for close connections, which has changed with the growing “professionalization” of the campus. He also comments of the tri-campus relationship and the sense of autonomy of what was then the English discipline (now Department of English) at Scarborough, despite the condescending view of Scarborough from St. George. Professor Brown also mentions some of the initiatives he has been involved with, such as the Anthology of Canadian Literature and the second largest reading series in Toronto that brought writers and poets to UTSC to speak to students.

Interview with Maydianne Andrade

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As Vice Dean of UTSC, Maydianne talks about her educational journey that has led to her position at UTSC. She highlights her experience as a Black woman in education, especially her time as one of the only Black women in fundamental sciences. She speaks about people, specifically women, of color and their involvement levels in the university. She later goes on to relfect on her 20 years at UTSC, ranging from her initial impression of the campus and how it may impact its overall perception in comparison to UTM while also highlighting how the campus has changed within this time.

Interview with Clare Hasenkampf

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Clare Hasenkampf is a professor at the University of Toronto Scarborough's Department of Biological Sciences and Director for the Center for Teaching and Learning. Clare begins by discussing her curiosity and exploration-driven love for the sciences and the path she had taken from New Orleans, Florida, and UCSD that led her to UTSC. She touches upon her journey as a woman in science, the differences she has noticed between St. George and UTSC, along with the changes and development of the campus that she has witnessed from her arrival on the campus in 1989. Clare reflects on her past experiences as a student, as well as a professor, to highlight how such memories have impacted her view of, and initiatives surrounding, pedagogy.

Interview with Jennifer McKelvie

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A graduate of UTSC, and a City Council Member for Ward 25, Jennifer McKelvie shares her experience of being a life-long resident of Scarborough and seeing the changes that have occurred over time. She shares her perception regarding the demographics of the UTSC student body and faculty during her educational career and how women mentorship is a critical component to women’s success. Building on her relationship with UTSC, she speaks about a new partnership called Fine Dining which highlights the diversity of Scarborough and family-run shops, as well as the important role UTSC plays in the larger social community.

Interview with Craig Heron

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Craig Heron, as a former professor of working-class history at York University, highlights the link between activism and history. Craig discusses how the New Left has contributed to his political involvement in protests for the democratization of the university as a UofT student and later involvements in strikes as a faculty member at York University. Lastly, Craig touches upon his initiatives as the President of Toronto Worker’ History Project, especially in regards to the production of community plays that he wrote surrounding different historical themes such as the Russian Revolution and the Winnipeg General Strike.

Interview with Yvonne Garson

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Yvonne, a Polish resident of Guildwood Village, speaks about her journey to Canada and her experiences, particularly in Scarbourough. Explaining the reasons behind her parents' decision to come to Canada after World War II, Yvonne mentions how she moved around the GTA and finally settled in Guildwood, and she appreciated the close-knit community that it fostered. She elaborates on the early days of Guildwood Village and how the community members add value and take care of it.

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